T. S. Eliot

 

 

Reflections on Contemporary Poetry

[Auszug]

 

Text
Editionsbericht
Literatur: T. S. Eliot
Literatur: The Egoist

 

IT is not true that the development of a writer is a function of his development as a man, but it is possible to say that there is a close analogy between the sort of experience which develops a man and the sort of experience which develops a writer. Experience in living may leave the literary embryo still dormant, and the progress of literary development may to a considerable extent take place in a soul left immature in living. But similar types of experience form the nourishment of both. There is a kind of stimulus for a writer which is more important than the stimulus of admiring another writer. Admiration leads most often to imitation; we can seldom remain long unconscious of our imitating another, and the awareness of our debt naturally leads us to hatred of the object imitated. If we stand toward a writer in this other relation of which I speak we do not imitate him, and though we are quite as likely to be accused of it, we are quite unperturbed by the charge. This relation is a feeling of profound kinship, or rather of a peculiar personal intimacy, with another, probably a dead author. It may overcome us suddenly, on first or after long acquaintance; it is certainly a crisis; and when a young writer is seized with his first passion of this sort he may be changed, metamorphosed almost, within a few weeks even, from a bundle of second-hand sentiments into a person. The imperative intimacy arouses for the first time a real, an unshakeable confidence. That you possess this secret knowledge, this intimacy, with the dead man, that after few or many years or centuries you should have appeared, with this indubitable claim to distinction; who can penetrate at once the thick and dusty circumlocutions about his reputation, can call yourself alone his friend: it is something more than encouragement to you. It is a cause of development, like personal relations in life. Like personal intimacies in life, it may and probably will pass, but it will be ineffaceable.

The usefulness of such a passion is various. For one thing it secures us against forced admiration, from attending to writers simply because they are great. We are never at ease with people who, to us, are merely great. We are not ourselves great enough for that: probably not one man in each generation is great enough to be intimate with Shakespeare. Admiration for the great is only a sort of discipline to keep us in order, a necessary snobbism to make us mind our places. We may not be great lovers; but if we had a genuine affair with a real poet of any degree we have acquired a monitor to avert us when we are not in love. Indirectly, there are other acquisitions: our friendship gives us an introduction to the society in which our friend moved; we learn its origins and its endings; we are broadened. We do not imitate, we are changed; and our work is the work of the changed man; we have not borrowed, we have been quickened, and we become bearers of a tradition.

 

 

 

 

Erstdruck und Druckvorlage

The Egoist.
Bd. 6, 1919, Nr. 3, Juli, S. 39-40.

Gezeichnet: T. S. Eliot.

Unser Auszug: S. 39.

Die Textwiedergabe erfolgt nach dem ersten Druck (Editionsrichtlinien).


The Egoist   online
URL: https://modjourn.org/journal/egoist/
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000529711
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/102458528

The Egoist   inhaltsanalytische Bibliographie
URL: https://www.unionofegoists.com/journals/the-egoist-1914/#index-of-issues

 

 

Zeitschriften-Repertorium

 

Kommentierte und kritische Ausgabe

 

 

 

Literatur: T. S. Eliot

Brandmeyer, Rudolf: Poetiken der Lyrik: Von der Normpoetik zur Autorenpoetik. In: Handbuch Lyrik. Theorie, Analyse, Geschichte. Hrsg. von Dieter Lamping. 2. Aufl. Stuttgart 2016, S. 2-15.

Callison, Jamie: Transmuting F. H. Bradley. T. S. Eliot's Notes Towards a Theory of Poetry. In: T. S. Eliot Studies Annual 1 (2017), S. 99-113.

Cianci, Giovanni u.a. (Hrsg.): T. S. Eliot and the Concept of Tradition. Cambridge u.a. 2007.

Gallup, Donald: T. S. Eliot. A Bibliography. London 1969.

Harding, Jason (Hrsg.): The New Cambridge Companion to T. S. Eliot. Cambridge 2017.

Kindley, Evan: Poet-Critics and the Administration of Culture. Cambridge MA u. London 2017.

Lipking, Lawrence: Poet-critics. In: The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism. Bd. 7: Modernism and the New Criticism. Hrsg. von A. Walton Litz. Cambridge u.a. 2000, S. 439-467.

Plasa, Stefan: Knots und Vortices. T. S. Eliots und Ezra Pounds Dichtungstheorie zwischen Tradition und Innovation. Paderborn u.a. 2010.

Pondrom, Cyrena N.: The Road from Paris. French Influence on English Poetry, 1900 – 1920. Cambridge 2010.   –   Zuerst 1974.

Rabaté, Jean-Michel: Tradition and T. S. Eliot. In: The Cambridge Companion to T. S. Eliot. Hrsg. von A. David Moody. 10. Aufl. Cambridge u.a. 2008, S. 210-222.

Rainey, Lawrence: Eliot's Poetics: Classicism and Histrionics. In: A Companion to T. S. Eliot. Hrsg. von David E. Chinitz. Oxford 2009, S. 301-310.

White, Peter: Tradition and the Individual Talent Revisited. In: Review of English Studies 58,235 (2007), S. 364-392.

 

 

Literatur: The Egoist

Binckes, Faith / Snyder, Carey (Hrsg.): Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1890s-1920s. The Modernist Period. Edinburgh 2019.

Bornstein, George: Material Modernism. The Politics of the Page. New York 2001.

Brooker, Peter: The Freewoman, The New Freewoman et The Egoist: femmes modernes et modernisme masculin. In: Revues modernistes anglo-américaines. Lieux d'échanges, lieux d’exil. Hrsg. von Benoît Tadié. Paris 2006, S. 129-140.

Clarke, Bruce: D. H. Lawrence and the Egoist Group. In: Journal of Modern Literature 18.1 (1992), S. 65-76.
URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/3831547

Clarke, Bruce: Dora Marsden and Early Modernism: Gender, Individualism, Science. Ann Arbor 1996.

Clarke, Bruth: Suffragism, Imagism, and the "Cosmic Poet": Scientism and Spirituality in The Freewoman and The Egoist. In: Little Magazines & Modernism. New Approaches. Hrsg. von Suzanne Churchill u. Adam McKible. Aldershot, England 2007, S. 119-131.

Cuny, Noëlle: D'un style scientifique dans certaines revues d’avant-garde (BLAST, The Signature, The Egoist, 1914-1915). In: Études de stylistique anglaise [En ligne] 2 (2011), S. 23-38.
URL: http://journals.openedition.org/esa/1783

Doyle, Charles: Richard Aldington. A Biography. Basingstoke u.a. 1989.

Harding, Jason: Tradition and Egoism: T. S. Eliot and The Egoist. In: T. S. Eliot and the Concept of Tradition. Hrsg. von Giovanni Cianci. Cambridge u.a. 2007, S. 90-102.

Marek, Jayne: Women Editing Modernism. Lexington 1995.

Morrisson, Mark S.: The Public Face of Modernism. Little Magazines, Audiences, and Reception, 1905-1920. Madison, Wis. u.a. 2001.
Kap 3: Marketing British Modernism: The Freewoman, the Egoist, and Counterpublic Speres (S. 84-132).

Rabaté, Jean-Michel: Tradition moderniste ou taxonomie des petites revues: The New Age, The Egoist, transition. In: Revues modernistes anglo-américaines. Lieux d'échanges, lieux d’exil. Hrsg. von Benoît Tadié. Paris 2006, S. 31-57.

Rabaté, Jean-Michel: Gender and Modernism: The Freewoman (1911-12); The New Freewoman (1913), and The Egoist (1914-19). In: The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines. Hrsg. von Peter Brooker u.a. Bd. 1: Britain and Ireland 1880-1955. Oxford 2009, S. 269-289.

Thacker, Andrew: Dora Marsden and The Egoist: "Our War Is With Words". In: English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920. Vol. 36.2 (1993), S. 179-196.

 

 

Edition
Lyriktheorie » R. Brandmeyer