Walter Pater

 

 

Studies in the History of the Renaissance

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That he is thus a characteristic specimen of the poetical taste of that age, is indeed Du Bellay's chief interest. But if his work is to have the highest sort of interest, if it is to do something more than satisfy curiosity, if it is to have an æsthetic as distinct from an historic value, it is not enough for a poet to have been the true child of his age, to have conformed to its æ sthetic conditions, and by so conforming to have charmed and stimulated that age; it is necessary that there should be perceptible in his work something individual, inventive, unique, the impress there of the writer's own temper and personality. This impress M. Sainte-Beuve thought he found in the 'Antiquités de Rome' and the 'Regrets,' which he ranks as what has been called poésie intime, that intensely modern sort of poetry in which the writer has for his aim the portrayal of his own most intimate moods, to take the reader into his confidence. That generation had other instances of this intimacy of sentiment: Montaigne's Essays are full of it, the carvings of the church of Brou are full of it. M. Sainte-Beuve has perhaps exaggerated the influence of this quality in Du Bellay's 'Regrets'; but the very name of the book has a touch of Rousseau [142] about it, and reminds one of a whole generation of self-pitying poets in modern times. It was in the atmosphere of Rome, to him so strange and mournful, that these pale flowers grew up; for that journey to Italy, which he deplored as the greatest misfortune of his life, put him in full possession of his talent, and brought out all its originality. And in effect you do find intimité, intimacy, here. The trouble of his life is analysed, and the sentiment of it conveyed directly to our minds; not a great sorrow or passion, but only the sense of loss in passing days, the ennui of a dreamer who has to plunge into the world's affairs, the opposition between life and the ideal, a longing for rest, nostalgia, homesickness — that preeminently childish, but so suggestive sorrow, as significant of the final regret of all human creatures for the familiar earth and limited sky. The feeling for landscape is often described as a modern one; still more so is that for antiquity, the sentiment of ruins. Du Bellay has this sentiment. The duration of the hard sharp outlines of things is a grief to him, and passing his wearisome days among the ruins of ancient Rome, he is consoled by the thought that all must one day end, by the sentiment of the grandeur of nothingness, la grandeur du rien. With a strange touch of far-off mysticism, he thinks that le grand tout itself, into which all things pass, ought [143] itself sometimes to perish and pass away. Nothing less can relieve his weariness. From the stately aspects of Rome, his thoughts went back continually to France, to the smoking chimneys of his little village, the longer twilight of the North, la douceur Angevine; yet not so much to the real France, we may be sure, with its dark streets and roofs of rough-hewn slate, as to that other country with slenderer towers, and more winding rivers, and trees like flowers, and softer sunshine on more gracefully-proportioned fields and ways, which the fancy of the exile, and the pilgrim, and of the schoolboy far from home, and of those kept at home unwillingly, every where builds up before or behind them.

 

 

 

 

Erstdruck und Druckvorlage

Walter Pater: Studies in the History of the Renaissance.
London: Macmillan and Co. 1873.

Unser Auszug: S. 141-143.

URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001112847
URL: https://archive.org/details/studiesinhistor01pategoog

Die Textwiedergabe erfolgt nach dem ersten Druck (Editionsrichtlinien).

 

 

 

Werkverzeichnis


Verzeichnis

Wright, Samuel: A Bibliography of the Writings of Walter H. Pater.
Folkestone: Dawson 1975.


Pater, Walter: Winckelmann.
In: The Westminster Review.
1867, Januar, S. 80–110.
URL: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000506030
URL: http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/serial?id=westminsterreview

Pater, Walter: Poems by William Morris.
In: The Westminster Review.
1868, Oktober, S. 300-312.
URL: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000506030
URL: http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/serial?id=westminsterreview

Pater, Walter: Studies in the History of the Renaissance.
London: Macmillan and Co. 1873.
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001112847
URL: https://archive.org/details/studiesinhistor01pategoog

Pater, Walter: On Wordsworth.
In: The Fortnightly Review.
Bd. 21, 1874, April, S. 455-465.
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008882609
URL: http://opacplus.bsb-muenchen.de/title/715786-1

Pater, Walter: Romanticism.
In: Macmillan's Magazine.
Bd. 35, 1876/77, November 1876, S. 64-70.
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000061600

Pater, Walter: Dante Gabriel Rossetti.
In: The English Poets.
Selections with Critical Introductions by Various Writers, and a General Introduction by Matthew Arnold.
Edited by Thomas Humphry Ward.
Vol. 4: Wordsworth to Rossetti.
Second Edition, Revised. London: Macmillan and Co. 1883, S. 633-641.
URL: https://archive.org/details/englishpoetswor00unkngoog

Pater, Walter: Marius the Epicurean. His Sensations and Ideas.
2 Bde. London: Macmillan and Co. 1885.
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001910607
URL: https://archive.org/advancedsearch.php

Pater, Walter: Imaginary Portraits.
London: Macmillan and Co. and New York 1887.
URL: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001024227

Pater, Walter: Style.
In: The Fortnightly Review.
Bd. 44, 1888, Dezember, S. 728-743.

Pater, Walter: Appreciations. With an Essay on Style.
London: Macmillan and Co. and New York 1889.
URL: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001112390
URL: https://archive.org/details/cu31924104003326

 

 

 

Literatur

Lee, Adam: The Ethics of Contemplation. Pater's Reading of Aristotle. In: Pater the Classicist. Classical Scholarship, Reception, and Aestheticism. Hrsg. von Charles Martindale u.a. Oxford 2017, S. 309-323.

Armstrong, Isobel: Victorian Scrutinies. Reviews of Poetry 1830-1870. London 1972.

Bann, Stephen (Hrsg.): The Reception of Walter Pater in Europe. London 2004.

Brake, Laurel (Hrsg.): Pater in the 1990s. Greensboro, NC 1991.

Bristow, Joseph (Hrsg.): The Victorian Poet. Poetics and Persona. London u.a. 1987.

Bristow, Joseph: Reforming Victorian poetry: poetics after 1832. In: The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Poetry. Hrsg. von Joseph Bristow. Cambridge u.a. 2000, S. 1-24.

Christ, Carol T.: Victorian Poetics. In: A Companion to Victorian Poetry. Hrsg. von Richard Cronin u.a. Malden, MA 2002, S. 1-21.

Hext, Kate: Walter Pater. Individualism and Aesthetic Philosophy. Edinburgh 2013.

Marcus, Laura u.a. (Hrsg.): Late Victorian into Modern. Oxford 2016.

Martus, Steffen u.a. (Hrsg.): Lyrik im 19. Jahrhundert. Gattungspoetik als Reflexionsmedium der Kultur. Bern u.a. 2005 (= Publikationen zur Zeitschrift für Germanistik, 11).

Nash, Jerry C.: 'The Poet of One Poem'. Du Bellay, Walter Pater, and Modern Aesthetic Criticism. In: Oeuvres et Critiques 20.1 (1995), S. 113-119.

Seiler, R. M. (Hrsg.): Walter Pater. The Critical Heritage. London u.a. 1980.

Shmiefsky, Marvel: A Study in Aesthetic Relativism. Pater's Poetics. In: Victorian Poetry 6 (1968) 105-124.

Vinken, Barbara: Du Bellay und Petrarca. Das Rom der Renaissance. Tübingen 2001.
Vgl. S. 216.

 

 

Edition
Lyriktheorie » R. Brandmeyer